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Nepal: Transit clinic for street children

No roof over your head, no three meals a day, and no possibility of going to school. For more than 5000 children in Kathmandu, this is their life. These children often have little idea of hygiene, they search through refuse to find food, and they are at great risk for diseases and injuries. The transit clinic run by Child Watabaran Center Nepal (CWCN) helps these children by giving them medical assistance and information about health and hygiene.

Street children in Kathmandu are confronted with drugs, prostitution and theft. They are frequently found with wounds that they have covered with mud to stop the bleeding or with wounds bandaged with dirty clothes or plastic. Ignorance about hygiene and the lack of access to medical care mean that these children run a great risk of contracting diseases such as scabies, diarrhoea, tuberculosis and HIV/Aids. The transit clinic is just one of several projects that CWCN has set up for street children.

Contribution to transit Clinic 2013

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2013 - 31 Dec 2013: 1x 

Contribution to transit Clinic 2013

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2013 - 31 Dec 2013: 1x 

Transit Clinic 2011

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2011 - 31 Dec 2011: 1x 

Transit Clinic 2011

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2011 - 31 Dec 2011: 1x 

Transit Clinic 2010

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2010 - 31 Dec 2010: 1x 

Transit Clinic 2009

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2009 - 31 Dec 2009: 1x 

Transit Clinic 2008

Funds are used to cover the operational costs, such as rent and electricity, medicine, food, salary costs for a medical assistant during the day and night, a coordinator, kitchen help and a medical doctor (2 hours per day).

01 Jan 2008 - 31 Dec 2008: 1x 

Through this transit clinic CWCN provides street children in Kathmandu with a place where they can go for help for health problems and answers to their questions. The transit clinic treats children that need more extensive medical care than what the foundation’s mobile health service can deliver. This bus drives around in areas where many street children are found and offers them medical assistance. The children who go to the transit clinic would often be turned away by a regular hospital but here at the transit clinic they receive the extra attention they so urgently need.   

By having this transit clinic available, the street children in Kathmandu are much more likely to seek out medical care. They can also come here for answers about health and hygiene. Usually, children come here after being referred by the CWCN mobile health service, because they sometimes need follow-up treatment after having been treated by health care workers operating from the bus. A regular hospital would not often accept them, but the transit clinic can provide these children with a thorough course of treatment. The clinic is also used to provide information about such things as hygiene, sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/Aids.

Since the clinic is permanently located near various refuse dumps and is open 24 hours a day, it greatly increases access to health care for street children in Kathmandu. A nurse and a social worker are always available, and a physician spends two hours a day at the clinic. Serious cases are referred to the hospital. During the days a child spends at the transit clinic, a great deal of attention is also devoted to his or her psychological problems. After treatment, some are transferred to the CWCN shelter; others will be monitored when returning to their family. Either way, the ultimate goal is to prevent them from returning to a life on the streets.

Donations are used to keep the transit clinic in operation that involves such costs as rent for the building, personnel costs and medications.

Child Watabaran Center Nepal (CWCN)

Child Watabaran Center Nepel (CWCN) is an NGO established in 2002, to work with the street children of Kathmandu providing them shelter, health care and education. This is the story of Tirtha Raj Rasaili, the founder of a children’s home in Nepal, and, but far most the story of the street children of Nepal. When you look at him, he is just an ordinary person. But if you hear what he has established, you know he is not. Tirtha Raj Rasaili was a radio reporter in Nepal when he saw the awful conditions of the street children in Nepal. He was convinced that there was a way of helping the street children turn their life into a positive direction. Tirtha turned this idea into practice in 2002 by offering street children a home, health care and education. The CWCN was born.

Net4kids cooperates with CWCN since 2004. The first supported project was the mobile health service, over the years support was extended to building a girls home, running costs for this home and a transit clinic for street children.